/page/2
laicepssieinna:

From brakethrough_ig - They wouldn’t let us shoot the descent off the Kemmelberg, so instead we did the climb with @brakethrough_jf - BUT then we got this… @bomtoonen dancing up the pavé. #allsgoodintheend eh @kevindish369 ?!? http://ift.tt/1zSbHuGVive le Vélo

laicepssieinna:

From brakethrough_ig - They wouldn’t let us shoot the descent off the Kemmelberg, so instead we did the climb with @brakethrough_jf - BUT then we got this… @bomtoonen dancing up the pavé. #allsgoodintheend eh @kevindish369 ?!? http://ift.tt/1zSbHuG
Vive le Vélo

The Small Island Developing States Conference has a set of great infographics about its key themes that we’ll be posting over the next few days. If you like what you see, apply to join the Aotearoa Youth Leadership Institute's delegation here!

The Small Island Developing States Conference has a set of great infographics about its key themes that we’ll be posting over the next few days. If you like what you see, apply to join the Aotearoa Youth Leadership Institute's delegation here!

The Verb 2.0 - Say hello!

I just supported The Verb 2.0, because Linh and her team rule. Great friends, so please support them on @ThunderclapIt // @VerbWeb

christianquotesforyou:

Unstoppable love by Jesus Culture

Quite possibly the strangest use I’ve ever seen for a photo of the Grafton Bridge suicide barriers.

christianquotesforyou:

Unstoppable love by Jesus Culture

Quite possibly the strangest use I’ve ever seen for a photo of the Grafton Bridge suicide barriers.

(via anindeliblechange)

gumirin:

Peter Sagan is actually Makishima Yuusuke.

 I know Sagan isn’t actually standing climbing but cLOSE ENOUGH.

Amazing.

(via kingofpapaya)

As forests are cleared and species vanish, there's one other loss: a world of languages

climateadaptation:

I wonder - can recording and storing a lost language conserve a culture? How?

The loss of human culture is frightening. Nearly all the threatened languages are spoken by indigenous peoples and, along with the languages, the traditional knowledge of these cultures is being forgotten. The names, uses, and preparation of medicines, the methods of farming, fishing and hunting are disappearing, not to mention the vast array of spiritual and religious beliefs and practices which are as diverse and numerous as the languages themselves.
– According to a report by researchers Jonathan Loh at the Zoological Society of London and David Harmon, the steep declines in both languages and nature mirror each other. One in four of the world’s 7,000 languages are now threatened with extinction, and linguistic diversity is declining as fast as biodiversity – about 30% since 1970. (via climateadaptation)

http://grinderbot.tumblr.com/post/92194335307/m1k3y-tibetans-live-in-a-region-that-averages

m1k3y:

“Tibetans live in a region that averages more than 4,000 meters above sea level. (Not for nothing is it called the roof of the world.) How did they come to be able to cope with their extreme environs? Some researchers in China and the United States think they might know, and their…

Incredible.

(Source: Slate)

ironcheflancaster:

batmansymbol:

by the way did I ever tell y’all about the time I got a blank message from nobody, sent on new year’s eve in 1969, when the internet didn’t exist?
because that happened

OKAY KIDS, LET’S LEARN ABOUT THE UNIX EPOCH
So back in the early days of computers, when we were trying to build clocks to keep all our computers in sync, we tried a bunch of different ways to synchronize them in ways that both normal people could use and programmers could utilize.
We just tried saying “The current time is THIS date” and just storing that date as some text, but while that was easy for humans, it was a bunch of different numbers that worked together in funny ways and computers don’t play nice with a bunch of random, arbitrary rules.
Not much worked, until we realized that we needed a BASELINE to compare against, and a way to represent the current time that covers everybody. So we came up with Unix time, because Unix was the style at the time. Essentially, Unix time represents any given time by saying “How many seconds ago was 12:00 AM on January 1, 1970 in Iceland somewhere?”. Recent enough to keep the numbers relatively small, far enough that nothing computer-y would fall before it, and consistent enough that there’d be no discrepancy based on where you are.
So what happens when you see the date “December 31, 1969” on a buggy message like this is that the computer received a bunch of zeroes by mistake and went “Oh, this must be a message!” Then when it tried to interpret it, it got to the date, found a zero, and said “Zero seconds since the Unix Epoch? I’ll round down - this was sent at the last second of New Year’s Eve, 1969! They’ll be so happy to finally get their blank message.”
And then the computer traipsed off on its merry way, because computers are fucking ridiculous.

ironcheflancaster:

batmansymbol:

by the way did I ever tell y’all about the time I got a blank message from nobody, sent on new year’s eve in 1969, when the internet didn’t exist?

because that happened

OKAY KIDS, LET’S LEARN ABOUT THE UNIX EPOCH

So back in the early days of computers, when we were trying to build clocks to keep all our computers in sync, we tried a bunch of different ways to synchronize them in ways that both normal people could use and programmers could utilize.

We just tried saying “The current time is THIS date” and just storing that date as some text, but while that was easy for humans, it was a bunch of different numbers that worked together in funny ways and computers don’t play nice with a bunch of random, arbitrary rules.

Not much worked, until we realized that we needed a BASELINE to compare against, and a way to represent the current time that covers everybody. So we came up with Unix time, because Unix was the style at the time. Essentially, Unix time represents any given time by saying “How many seconds ago was 12:00 AM on January 1, 1970 in Iceland somewhere?”. Recent enough to keep the numbers relatively small, far enough that nothing computer-y would fall before it, and consistent enough that there’d be no discrepancy based on where you are.

So what happens when you see the date “December 31, 1969” on a buggy message like this is that the computer received a bunch of zeroes by mistake and went “Oh, this must be a message!” Then when it tried to interpret it, it got to the date, found a zero, and said “Zero seconds since the Unix Epoch? I’ll round down - this was sent at the last second of New Year’s Eve, 1969! They’ll be so happy to finally get their blank message.”

And then the computer traipsed off on its merry way, because computers are fucking ridiculous.

(via crookedindifference)

Arctic Methane Emergency Group - AMEG - METHANE

warrenellis:

"It is certain if the Arctic is not cooled these Arctic methane sources will greatly
increase with global warming and that will greatly increase the rate of global
warming. Unstoppable runaway Arctic warming will lead to unstoppable
runaway global warming. To prevent runaway Arctic warming the Arctic must be
cooled.”

Great to see #Karangahape Road will be getting proper #cycle lanes. Well done Gen Zero. #auckland #transport #bikes

Great to see #Karangahape Road will be getting proper #cycle lanes. Well done Gen Zero. #auckland #transport #bikes

Russell Davies: the basics

Simple truth.

laicepssieinna:

From brakethrough_ig - They wouldn’t let us shoot the descent off the Kemmelberg, so instead we did the climb with @brakethrough_jf - BUT then we got this… @bomtoonen dancing up the pavé. #allsgoodintheend eh @kevindish369 ?!? http://ift.tt/1zSbHuGVive le Vélo

laicepssieinna:

From brakethrough_ig - They wouldn’t let us shoot the descent off the Kemmelberg, so instead we did the climb with @brakethrough_jf - BUT then we got this… @bomtoonen dancing up the pavé. #allsgoodintheend eh @kevindish369 ?!? http://ift.tt/1zSbHuG
Vive le Vélo

Keen to visit Samoa? Apply here! http://www.ayli.org.nz/sids-2014/

Keen to visit Samoa? Apply here! http://www.ayli.org.nz/sids-2014/

The Small Island Developing States Conference has a set of great infographics about its key themes that we’ll be posting over the next few days. If you like what you see, apply to join the Aotearoa Youth Leadership Institute's delegation here!

The Small Island Developing States Conference has a set of great infographics about its key themes that we’ll be posting over the next few days. If you like what you see, apply to join the Aotearoa Youth Leadership Institute's delegation here!

The Verb 2.0 - Say hello!

I just supported The Verb 2.0, because Linh and her team rule. Great friends, so please support them on @ThunderclapIt // @VerbWeb

christianquotesforyou:

Unstoppable love by Jesus Culture

Quite possibly the strangest use I’ve ever seen for a photo of the Grafton Bridge suicide barriers.

christianquotesforyou:

Unstoppable love by Jesus Culture

Quite possibly the strangest use I’ve ever seen for a photo of the Grafton Bridge suicide barriers.

(via anindeliblechange)

gumirin:

Peter Sagan is actually Makishima Yuusuke.

 I know Sagan isn’t actually standing climbing but cLOSE ENOUGH.

Amazing.

(via kingofpapaya)

As forests are cleared and species vanish, there's one other loss: a world of languages

climateadaptation:

I wonder - can recording and storing a lost language conserve a culture? How?

The loss of human culture is frightening. Nearly all the threatened languages are spoken by indigenous peoples and, along with the languages, the traditional knowledge of these cultures is being forgotten. The names, uses, and preparation of medicines, the methods of farming, fishing and hunting are disappearing, not to mention the vast array of spiritual and religious beliefs and practices which are as diverse and numerous as the languages themselves.
– According to a report by researchers Jonathan Loh at the Zoological Society of London and David Harmon, the steep declines in both languages and nature mirror each other. One in four of the world’s 7,000 languages are now threatened with extinction, and linguistic diversity is declining as fast as biodiversity – about 30% since 1970. (via climateadaptation)

http://grinderbot.tumblr.com/post/92194335307/m1k3y-tibetans-live-in-a-region-that-averages

m1k3y:

“Tibetans live in a region that averages more than 4,000 meters above sea level. (Not for nothing is it called the roof of the world.) How did they come to be able to cope with their extreme environs? Some researchers in China and the United States think they might know, and their…

Incredible.

(Source: Slate)

ironcheflancaster:

batmansymbol:

by the way did I ever tell y’all about the time I got a blank message from nobody, sent on new year’s eve in 1969, when the internet didn’t exist?
because that happened

OKAY KIDS, LET’S LEARN ABOUT THE UNIX EPOCH
So back in the early days of computers, when we were trying to build clocks to keep all our computers in sync, we tried a bunch of different ways to synchronize them in ways that both normal people could use and programmers could utilize.
We just tried saying “The current time is THIS date” and just storing that date as some text, but while that was easy for humans, it was a bunch of different numbers that worked together in funny ways and computers don’t play nice with a bunch of random, arbitrary rules.
Not much worked, until we realized that we needed a BASELINE to compare against, and a way to represent the current time that covers everybody. So we came up with Unix time, because Unix was the style at the time. Essentially, Unix time represents any given time by saying “How many seconds ago was 12:00 AM on January 1, 1970 in Iceland somewhere?”. Recent enough to keep the numbers relatively small, far enough that nothing computer-y would fall before it, and consistent enough that there’d be no discrepancy based on where you are.
So what happens when you see the date “December 31, 1969” on a buggy message like this is that the computer received a bunch of zeroes by mistake and went “Oh, this must be a message!” Then when it tried to interpret it, it got to the date, found a zero, and said “Zero seconds since the Unix Epoch? I’ll round down - this was sent at the last second of New Year’s Eve, 1969! They’ll be so happy to finally get their blank message.”
And then the computer traipsed off on its merry way, because computers are fucking ridiculous.

ironcheflancaster:

batmansymbol:

by the way did I ever tell y’all about the time I got a blank message from nobody, sent on new year’s eve in 1969, when the internet didn’t exist?

because that happened

OKAY KIDS, LET’S LEARN ABOUT THE UNIX EPOCH

So back in the early days of computers, when we were trying to build clocks to keep all our computers in sync, we tried a bunch of different ways to synchronize them in ways that both normal people could use and programmers could utilize.

We just tried saying “The current time is THIS date” and just storing that date as some text, but while that was easy for humans, it was a bunch of different numbers that worked together in funny ways and computers don’t play nice with a bunch of random, arbitrary rules.

Not much worked, until we realized that we needed a BASELINE to compare against, and a way to represent the current time that covers everybody. So we came up with Unix time, because Unix was the style at the time. Essentially, Unix time represents any given time by saying “How many seconds ago was 12:00 AM on January 1, 1970 in Iceland somewhere?”. Recent enough to keep the numbers relatively small, far enough that nothing computer-y would fall before it, and consistent enough that there’d be no discrepancy based on where you are.

So what happens when you see the date “December 31, 1969” on a buggy message like this is that the computer received a bunch of zeroes by mistake and went “Oh, this must be a message!” Then when it tried to interpret it, it got to the date, found a zero, and said “Zero seconds since the Unix Epoch? I’ll round down - this was sent at the last second of New Year’s Eve, 1969! They’ll be so happy to finally get their blank message.”

And then the computer traipsed off on its merry way, because computers are fucking ridiculous.

(via crookedindifference)

Arctic Methane Emergency Group - AMEG - METHANE

warrenellis:

"It is certain if the Arctic is not cooled these Arctic methane sources will greatly
increase with global warming and that will greatly increase the rate of global
warming. Unstoppable runaway Arctic warming will lead to unstoppable
runaway global warming. To prevent runaway Arctic warming the Arctic must be
cooled.”

Great to see #Karangahape Road will be getting proper #cycle lanes. Well done Gen Zero. #auckland #transport #bikes

Great to see #Karangahape Road will be getting proper #cycle lanes. Well done Gen Zero. #auckland #transport #bikes

Russell Davies: the basics

Simple truth.

"The loss of human culture is frightening. Nearly all the threatened languages are spoken by indigenous peoples and, along with the languages, the traditional knowledge of these cultures is being forgotten. The names, uses, and preparation of medicines, the methods of farming, fishing and hunting are disappearing, not to mention the vast array of spiritual and religious beliefs and practices which are as diverse and numerous as the languages themselves."

About:

Espresso | Bikes | Tattoos | Suits

I am a litigation lawyer from Auckland, New Zealand. I drink a lot of coffee and work too much. This is a blog about the things I enjoy.

"This was not a real attack. It was…I pushed a gear less [a lower gear] and yeah, went, yeah, like steady up with more speed. I heard on the radio that there’s a gap, so I pushed again more." - Fabien Cancellara

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IQ
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